Powells Has Landed

When I was a kid growing up in Connecticut, my favorite treat place was the Ice Cream Parlor (or maybe Parlour) in Westport. This recreation of a Gay Nineties ice cream parlor had small marble tables, wire-back chairs, an old-fashioned soda fountain (that made free ice cream sundaes or banana splits for anyone with a birthday) and employees in old-style garb. The boys wore striped shirts, white pants, suspenders, straw boaters and, for a while, faux handlebar moustaches. The girls’ outfits were similar to square dancers’ dresses.

Powell’s Sweet Shoppe has now landed on Boulder’s Pearl Street Mall. There’s no sit-down eating, there’s gelato instead of Borden’s (or whatever the Ice Cream Parlor/Parlour dished up), and the staff isn’t costumed. But oh, that penny candy to tickle the kid in us all. Lollipops, dots, small candy bars (including half-forgtten retro brands), jellybeans and M&M’s in all sorts of colors, filled candies, animal-shaped candies, gum, Pez refills (and dispensers to put them in) and much more. There’s even fine chocolate in bars or by the piece for the grownup in us, but that’s not why I’d go there.

Powell’s is based in San Francisco, and while I’ll still support buy boxes of Belgian-style fine chocolates from Colorado-based Belvedere Chocolates a couple of blocks away when I need a gift for a chocoholic and Rocky Mountain Chocolates when I’m wandering by and want a small chocolate fix. But when I want something cheery and smile-provoking, or when I just want to get in touch with my inner sweet-toothed child, I’ll be heading to Powells.

Boulder Dining Deals

First Bite Boulder (Nov. 11-18) is a week-long opportunity to try a new eatery or return to a favorite at a good price. Three-course meals at some of the city’s best restaurants from Aji to Zolo will be just $26 per person. Beverages, tax and gratuities are, of course, additional. Go to First Bite’s website and click on ‘Restaurants’ for a complete list, as well as click-on menus and, in some cases, links to on-line reservations. I’ve been to many of these restaurants myself and have posted writeups on my website ; click on ‘Dining Diary’ and use the clickable index to see whether I’ve reviewed the restaurant that interests you.

Chilean Food, Part Two

I’ve finally gotten to try a few restaurants (and also have found the apostrophe on this keyboard), so here goes.

One of my favorite features of an SATW convention is athe Dine Around, where attendees select or are assigned restaurants, which they visit in small, normal groups. My husband I were sent to one of a dozen restaurants in a Borderio, a sort-of mall with places to eat, drink and buy cigarettes (there is a dedicated Marlboro shop).

We were assigned to La Tabla, an Argentine-style steakhouse. This was odd because at our table for eight were two vegans and one non-red-meter eater. The decor is contemporary gaucho with red tile floors. Cowhides on one wall. Spurs and stuff hanging from the rafters. The waiters are costumed as for the pampas.

We were given a choice of two appetizers, carpaccio of beef or carpaccio of salmon. Both came sliced paper thin and arranged in circles on the plates. The beef was OK, but the salmon was drowned in so much lemon that all I could taste was the the citrus. Even the capers could not assert themseles. For the main course, we had a choice of beef or salmon. (The vegans were accommodated with a plate of pasta.) For a side dish, the waiter gave a choice of souffle potatoes or souffle potatoes. The steakwas a thick cut that was flavorful enough but not especially tender. The salmon was dipped in a batter, sprinkled with sesame seeds, overcooked and blanketed in a gravy that everyone agreed tasted like beef but we were told was soy. The side effect was to make the batter soggy. The souffle potatoes were wonderful — crisp hollows of French fry-size sticks. They actually presented us with the regular dessert menu, and the postres were all OK. The most interesting was a large apple pancake.

The disappointing salmon was vindicated the next night, but I have to go. I promise to describe it next time I have computer access and time to use it.

Chilean Food, Part One

I have often said that like the army, the Society of American Travel Writers travels on its stomach. The 2006 convention is in Santiago, Chile, with a guarantee of huge meals. As with any conference, many meals are served to everyone (more than 500 of us) in a hotel function room. The Hyatt and Sheraton have made great efforts in serving some local specialties.

Among them have been various disappointing salmon preparations, outstanding fruit salads and a version of Pastel de Choclo. In Chile and elsewhere in southern South America, “choclo” (not mais or similar) is the word for corn. Pastel de Choclo, a casserole, is a summer specialty. Locals tell me that home cooks dice a couple of onions and saute them with chopped chopped garlic and salt. In another pan, they saute diced or ground beef. In yet another, they poach about four pieces of chicken in water. In an ovenproof clay pot, they combine the meat and sauteed vegetables. They top that with olives, raisins, slices of hard-boiled egg and finally the cooked chicken, which may be sliced or shredded. They shuck about 10 ears of corn and blend the kernels in a blender (with a little water “if necessary”). The corn mixture is spread on top and then sprinkled with sugar. They then bake it for about 20 minutes in at an oven setting that I could not discern, but I think must be moderate (350 to 375 degrees) until the sugar caramelizes. The hotel did it in quantity without the caramelized sugar. Other central Chilean specialties include cazuela, a soup of chicken, turkey, beef or pork with potatoes, pumpkin and green beans, also cooked in a clay pot. Empanadas filled with seasoned meat, poultry or seafood are ubiquitous, as is seaood in many forms.

More to come on restaurant meals.

First words from Chile

For a while, my posts will be from Chile. So far, since leaving Colorado, I´ve had food placed in front of me on two airlines: cookies from breakfast on American to LAX and one medicore dinner, one lousy snack and one mediocre breakfast on the long haul from LAX to Santiago on LAN Chile. No surprise. I am at a travel writers´convention in Santiago, staying at the Hyatt, which put on a nice buffet breakfast for the morning arrivals. The fresh fruit was fabulous, and the croissants were as brittle and flaky as the ones I love in Paris. More about other food once I´ve had some.

Cantaloupe Salsa

Leaving on a trip soon. Cleaning out refrigerator. Grilled some chicken. Made some rice. Concocted salsa with stuff that needed to be eaten. Here’s what I made (and the recipe is easily adjustable to whatever you might need to use up):

Cantaloupe Salsa

1/2 ripe cantaloupe, seeded, removed from rind and chopped
1/3 red onion, peeled and chopped
1/3 bunch fresh cilantro, stemmed and chopped
1/4 small can of chopped mild chiles
splash of Balsamic vinegar

Combine all chopped ingredients. Add enough Balsamic vinegar to tame the onion taste. Cover and refigerate until ready to use.

Speaking of Tofu…

…as we were recently, the Boulder Sunday Camera had an interesting feature today called “Travels of the Tofu King” (http://www.dailycamera.com/bdc/county_news/article/0,1713,BDC_2423_5068199,00.html). It is not so much about Steve Demos’s creation of White Wave Tofu (now moved from Boulder to Broomfield as a division of Dean Foods), but about the world travels that he and his wife, Sheryl, have undertaken since he left the company. Among other experiences, they managed to find the cave in India where he got the idea to start a tofu company.

He’s back in town now and will be a speaker at an upcoming natural food industry conference.
IMHO, natural/organic foods and really delicious foods are not mutually exclusive. Fresh and/or “unartificial” ingredients and flavors create just about the best-tasting and best-for-you food there is.

Claire Walter's Colorado-oriented but not Colorado-exclusive blog about restaurants, food and wine events, recipes and related news. For address of any restaurant, click on the Zomato icon at the end of the post.