Category Archives: Chef

Farewell to Mel’s

Mel’s to Close in Cherry Creek North

Singers planning retirement frequently book a farewell tour. Athletes announced their final season of competition. But too often, even treasured restaurants close abruptly, with no time for one, last nostalgic visit. Not so with Mel’s Restaurant and Bar (originally, Mel’s Bar and Grill), a Cherry Creek North eatery at 235 Fillmore Street that is closing on April 28 after 12 years as a favorite in Denver’s toniest shopping/dining district. Real estate issues are the reason that Mel’s owners Mel and Janie Master are shuttering the restaurant, but real estate isn’t what this blog is about. It’s about food.

I’m looking forward to one final visit to Mel’s with a couple of friends for lunch on April 24. If we had deeper pockets, we might have reserved spots for the $90 grand finale dinner that evening that will be prepared by past and present Mel’s chefs: Frank Bonnano, now owner of Mizuna and Luca d’Italia, Goose Sorensen, owner/chef of Solera, Tyler Wiard and Corey Treadway, now at Elway’s, and Chad Clevenger, currently the captain of the kitchen at Mel’s. The 24th is the Masters’ 42nd wedding anniversary, which somehow fitting. On the 28th, Chef Chad prepares popular dishes for Mel’s final curtain. If you want to attend one of these specials, or just wish to have a private last meal at Mel’s, call 303-333-3979.

Instead of going into deep mourning, the Masters, including their son, Charles, have already opened instant-hit Montecito at 1120 East 6th Avenue and plan Montecito South at Orchard and Holly. Executive chef for Monty North and Monty South, which is how the Masters refer to this California/Mediterranean eatery, is Chef Adam Mali. He was previously owner/chef of the sadly short-lived Restaurant Kody in Evergreen and more recently executive chef at Aspen’s Ajax Tavern. For reservations at Montecito, call 303-777-8222.

In the works, and also under Chef Mali’s culinary supervision, is Annabel’s, projected to open in May at 5960 South Holly Street in Greenwood Village. It will serve “American comfort food.” Annabel’s is named after Mel and Janie’s granddaughter and Charles’ daughter. I’m happy that I’ll have one more opportunity to eat at Mel’s and even happier that the Masters will be keeping Colorado foodies happy and well fed even after it closes — and if naming a restaurant after a grandchild is an indicator, hopefully for years to come.

Two Crested Butte Classics Change Hands

I’ve returned from Crested Butte and the North American SnowSports Journalists Association annual meeting. While there, I learned that two classic Crested Butte restaurants have new owners. Mac Bailey hit upon a successful all-you-can-eat formula of comfort food before that had a name. He had been dishing up skillet-fried chicken, steak, mashed potatoes, creamed corn, biscuits with honey butter, and the best cole slaw around since 1983. He has now sold The Slogar Bar & Restaurant to CJay Clark and Megan Barney, who aren’t messing with a winner and are keeping the old recipes and retaining the same old hospitality and friendly informality.

Meanwhile, around the corner, the exquisite little fine-dining establishment called Soupcon (right) has also changed hands. I believe that it was also owned by Mac Bailey, but executive chef Scott Greene, who was at the helm in the kitchen, put his own distinctive culinary stamp on it. Quaint and charming, Soupcon was and remains the stylistic opposite of The Slogar. Greene has relocated to warmer climes, specifically to Boca Raton, FL, leaving Soupcon in the best of hands. The new owner/chef is Jason Vernon, an alumnus of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, NY.

While Slogar’s menu remains unaltered, some things have changed at Soupcon and others not at all. Chef Jason changes Soupcon’s menu every three weeks or so. His sophisticated and refined cuisine relies on seasonal and especially local ingredients where possible. The achingly charming restaurant looks as it always has, with small tables decked out in crisp white linens and fresh flowers, and bentwood chairs that fit perfectly into this old log cabin in a quiet alley. Fine foods and wines to match remain the hallmark in this finest of all fine-dining restaurants in Crested Butte.