Science Museum Explores Chocolate

Special exhibition follows cacao from rainforest to candy.

The Denver Museum of Nature & Science debuted a new exhibition on chocolate, exploring its botanical, cultural, economic and culinary impacts. Called “CHOCOLATE: The Exhibition,” this modest visiting exhibition with its suitably bilingual captions was developed by Chicago’s exemplary Field Museum. It provides an enticing experience for the whole family during its brief stop in Denver.

As visitors progress from the Central American origins of the use of chocolate to the history and on to the present, the chocolate aroma becomes stronger. The captions are appropriately bilingual, as suits an exploration of a food that originated in Central America. At the exit, there is a chocolate  shop and a little café.  Double dare you not to stop.

The members’ opening event included tasting tables set up among the dioramas. Grand Junction-based Enstrom’s provided samples from dark and bitter to sweet milk chocolate. No special ticket is required, for this exhibition is included in the general admission. It is in town through May 8. Photography was challenging, so here are just a few images — the best I could manage:

Cacao tree in the rainforest.
Cacao tree in the rainforest with its robust pods that  produce a little seed that eventually yields what we know as chocolate.
Close-up in a case.
Close-up in a case.
Docent explaining the ins and outs of one the world's most beloved sweets.
Docent explaining the ins and outs of one the world’s most beloved sweets.
As chocolate reached Europe, it inspired a the development of elegant cups and pitchers to further its enjoyment by the elite,
As chocolate reached Europe, it inspired a the development of elegant cups and pitchers to further its enjoyment by the elite.
Café and chocolate shop at the exhibition exit.
Café and chocolate shop at the exhibition exit.