Cuban Sammies Suit a Cold Day

Strip shopping center eatery serves up a taste of the tropics.

P1010494Denver’s Cuba Cuba has been serving super mojitos and other rum drinks, and good Cuban fare for more than a decade. Located in an old cottage, it was a pioneering restaurant in the Golden Triangle. Cuba Cuba Sandwicheria, its younger sib, opened in Boulder last summer, and it’s taken a cold day in December to motivate us to give it a try.

Bright topical colors, Cuban music, antiqued wooden chairs, large-format photos of a decaying island capital and ancient cars do a decent job of evoking Havana in a strip shopping center in Colorado. Hard edges and a loud late lunchtime crowd made it difficult to carry on a non-shouted conversation, but otherwise, it was a congenial place for a mid-day meal. Only the blast of icy air when a door was opened brought the ambiance back to snowy Colorado.

Sides included tasty black beans and  Cuban fries that tasted like regular, limp fries.
Sides included tasty black beans and Cuban fries that tasted like regular, limp fries.
The Cubano, the signature sandwich wih roasted pork, ham, Swiss cheese, pickles and mustard on Cuban bread.
The Cubano, the signature sandwich wih roasted pork, ham, Swiss cheese, pickles and mustard on Cuban bread.

 

The Minuta de Pescado, a pressed sandwich filled with crispy mahi tempura, cabbage slaw and habanero aoili on whole-grain bread.
The Cubano, the signature pressed sandwich with roasted pork, ham, Swiss cheese, pickles and mustard on Cuban bread.

Price check: Sandwiches, $7; plates, $7-$8 including rice and black beans; sides, $2-$2.50; dessert, $3.25.

Cuba Cuba Sandwicheria on Urbanspoon

3 thoughts on “Cuban Sammies Suit a Cold Day”

  1. So, with some award winning blog or what not, and presenting yourself as a well-traveled, well-experienced person who “obviously” deserves attention for your opinion, couldn’t you at least spell-check your work? And if you know so much about food, why is it you can’t spell the ingredients correctly, because it makes me believe you actually don’t know what the ingredients or dishes are, and therefore your blog, and your opinion, are pretty much horse shit!
    Thanks for wasting cyberspace, at least I know to avoid you in the future.

    1. Thank you for pointing out my failings. Such comments (espcially the “horse shit” part) build character — and mine these days must be very strong. I’ve fixed the typos, three of which seem to have been in the same caption that I guess I failed (mea culpa) to reread. Not as an excuse but as a reason, please know that in December when I ate there and wrote the post, I was suffering from excruciating, blinding back pain. The rock hard chairs, coupled with ear-splitting din, did not help diminish my pain level. The restaurant was crowded, our table was right near the door and every icy blast when it was opened caused my sore back to spasm. Nevertheless, I tried to write a useful post. I have since had spinal surgery and life is far more comfortable. I apologize to you and other readers for the earlier errors, and I humbly suggest that you might consider not throwing the phrase “horse shit” around so liberally without knowing the backstory.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>